Category Archives: Discussions

Micro-Living. Who’s Coming With?

Victor Papanek stated, “We have learned to think of large cars as gas-guzzlers; similarly we must learn to see our homes as the space guzzlers they are,” in his book, “Design for the Real World.”

While space has become an issue as populations increase in a non-linear fashion, other driving factors such as increased mobility, ownership without the mortgage, semi-permanent camping and tourism, and last but not least, the displacement of ‘the material’ for the benefit of simplicity, savings, and a reconnection with others and environment.XO.2.2 2014-09-04 16255400000

“We are designing these homes to empower the owner and offer abundance through a more sustainable lifestyle,” says President and Principal Designer at Modern&TINY, Rob Irwin. “Foresight plays a huge factor in designing for the people, for the future. As the older demographics find themselves at the psychological cliff of retirement and the connotations that come with it, they find themselves in a position of choice and most of the time they want solace, simplicity and the opportunity to maintain a high quality of living without the overhead of a mortgage, or the maintenance that comes with owning a large home.”

In addition to the allure of micro-homes with the aging population, younger professionals are too finding themselves in a position to maintain a high quality of life, be near their place of employment while being near the progressive bustle that a city brings without the high costs of renting.

These ‘coming of age’ professionals also have a very distinct outlook on life and their place in it. No longer is the world seen as an immense sphere of endless resource offerings, clean air and crystal clear water. To many, living in a micro-home is a statement about who they are and a physical externalization of their beliefs about wanting to live in a clean, safe and sustainable way.XO.2.2 2014-09-07 18322700000

Modern&TINY understands the implication of continuing to spread into nature with our meandering communities of cul-de-sacs and pavement and believe that micro-living could just well be another tool in the toolbox of progress and a chapter in the book of shifting paradigms.

OUCH! This Tiny Home Isn’t Working!

I’m sure many have reveled in the tiny home movement. It has such an energy behind it and I can say with confidence the people involved and interested are amazing souls. On the flip side, the reality of living in a tiny home can be downright laughable to most who haven’t experienced it. The inescapable tiny little bathrooms, or overhead lofts…with no overhead are all part of the mix…or are they?

As an industrial designer and tiny home liaison, it’s quite often that ergonomics and human factors come up. Human factors is a field of study within the design world that entails design criteria for human form, movement, and use. It is also the study of form, placement, and arrangements.

We’ve all experienced poorly conceived products and environments. You could experiencing this when you bump your head or hip on a low overhang, or tight turn in a home, or maybe some product just doesn’t seem to fit well in your hand…or you find using the ‘thing’ to be too cumbersome and awkward. This is the design failure of human factors and ergonomics and why the application of human factors in the world of tiny homes are all the more important.
bang-headBeing constrained to tight spaces can be stressful! When designing a tiny home, moving freely and being able to navigate your environment is a must! For those versed in the habitation of tiny homes, I’m sure you concur.

For first-timers in a tiny home this can be a HUGE adjustment.  Living in a tiny home can be a boon for personal progress, it can also be the bane of your existence if all you do is bonk your mellon on the bathroom lights and trip on your steps every time you want to climb into bed.

Wait, there is hope! All of this can be mitigated, but only if considered from the beginning! Moving walls and shifting layouts in a tiny can be more than challenging, if not unfeasible. Appliances are also something to consider. I may post a continued blog from this regarding additional solutions, however, speaking with your designer/architect about your particular habits, ‘stuff needs’, and general lifestyle can go a long way to creating an environment that’s right for you in every way, shape and form. 😉

Note: If you have questions or are looking for a consultation, feel free to message us on FB at: Modern and TINY

Thanks, Rob

Tiny House Jamboree Shots!

Had such an amazing time at the Tiny House Jamboree! Almost 40,000 people in attendance over the weekend and amazing vibes all around.

#tinyhousejamboree #modernandtiny #tinygianthouse

MODERN & TINY

We have a FB page. Our tiny home design company will be at this years first ever Tiny Home Jamboree in Colorado Springs, CO. Come check the house out August 7-9th.

Come follow us on the ‘Book’ here: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Modern-and-TINY/985250308193388

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Come See Us!

Be sure to catch us at the Tiny House Jamboree in Colorado Springs, August, 7-9th, 2015. Looking forward to meeting everyone! This is going to be a HUGE event. The first of it’s kind with spectators, designers, suppliers, and builders from all 50 states and 5 countries!

Check out the event here on their page: https://www.tinyhousejamboree.com

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Shared: The science of why you should spend your money on experiences and not things

Source: FastCompany
Source: FastCompany

It’s counterintuitive that something like a physical object that you can keep for a long time doesn’t keep you as happy as long as a once-and-done experience does. Ironically, the fact that a material thing is ever present works against it, making it easier to adapt to. It fades into the background and becomes part of the new normal. But while the happiness from material purchases diminishes over time, experiences become an ingrained part of our identity.

“Our experiences are a bigger part of ourselves than our material goods,” says Gilovich. “You can really like your material stuff. You can even think that part of your identity is connected to those things, but nonetheless they remain separate from you. In contrast, your experiences really are part of you. We are the sum total of our experiences.”

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3043858/world-changing-ideas/the-science-of-why-you-should-spend-your-money-on-experiences-not-thing#

Yet another group jumping on the tiny movement…

Came across this little article. It makes a great case for the continuation of the tiny movement. Here’s the summary…

cityLAB believes that building small houses could make a big impact, and we will begin studying how to bring Tiny Houses to Garfield in late 2013. The idea of Tiny Houses was one outcome of our 2011 6% Place book, which examined how Garfield and Garfield residents could benefit from a systematic effort to grow the neighborhood’s creative capital and attract new residents. cityLAB has recently been awarded a grant by the Pittsburgh Partnership for Neighborhood Development to bring this idea to fruition.

Redefine YOUR American Dream!

I’m taking this FREE online MOOC from edX (MITx), and thought it quite pertinent to the discussion of tiny home living. Wanted to share, in case some of you out there are struggling to redefine your dreams.

https://www.edx.org/course/american-dream-next-generation-mitx-15-662x#.VRCUQMZR7MA
https://www.edx.org/course/american-dream-next-generation-mitx-15-662x#.VRCUQMZR7MA

Here’s an excerpt: To understand how we got here, and what we can do about it, we have to understand the world of work.  In this course, we’ll trace the history of work and employment that has made the economy work so well in the past.  And we’ll uncover what’s gone wrong, in order to figure out new solutions that fit today’s workforce, economy, and society.

We’ll also take you on a personal journey.  You’ll define what the “American Dream” means to you and your peers, no matter where you live.  What are your goals, aspirations and dreams?  How can you make them happen?

Cheers,

Rob